News

Date added: Dec 17, 2014 Escaped Cape Cobra (Naja Nivea) is caught with the help of our gloves

We are pleased to announce that after the Cape Cobra (Naja Nivea) escaped from a Dutch snake keeper it has been caught safely with our Venom Defender Gloves.
 
It was found in the neighbour’s shed, where it had been hiding.
 


Article in English:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/netherlands/11076896/Dutch-town-on-high-alert-over-escaped-deadly-cobra.html?fb

Article in Dutch:
http://www.telegraaf.nl/binnenland/23046769/__Cobra_ontsnapt_in_Made__.html


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Date added: Dec 15, 2014 Wrigglies DWA Course Reviewed


James's Whinnett is a part time assistant at Wrigglies and attended the course after seeing the team working with the DWA animals and after watching a couple of previous courses.
 
"For anyone interested in handling and keeping reptiles, especially snakes, I highly recommend the course provided by Wrigglies DWA at Wrigglies in Dunstable. The course takes you through the important aspects of health & safety and teaches you the practicalities of handling a range of venomous snakes, all in a very safe, controlled environment.
 
The course improved my knowledge, understanding and confidence of these beautiful but dangerous snakes plus I got to hold the alligator!
I really enjoyed all aspects of the course and look forward to putting my new found knowledge into practice! — with Julian Clare and Dave Clemens at Wrigglies."
 
 
VOR (Voice of Reptiles & Sales) group visit and DWA taster session at Wrigglies on 25/10/14

"For those of you who don’t want to read through a lengthy review i’ll summarise in a few words….. Absolutely fantastic experience - don’t think about it just do it!" Jenni Wenneberg

Click here for the full review; https://www.facebook.com/jenni.wenneberg/activity/10152781744821352
 

Dave Clemens of Wrigglies handles a Forest Cobra with Venom Defender Gloves.
 


Mick Webber
uses 2 Long Python Hooks to handle a Rhino Viper @ Wrigglies (under supervision of Dave Clemens @ Wrigglies).


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Date added: Dec 14, 2014 The importance of wearing gloves when cleaning out the cage of venomous snakes

We always recommend that one wears Venom Defender Gloves when cleaning out cages of venomous snakes.

The fangs are shed and can cause secondary invenomation.

In this photograph Julian Clare‎ of Wrigglies shows 10 gaboon viper fangs found in one stool!

Date added: Dec 8, 2014 House of Venom Handling Sessions

Thanks to Alex Jeyes @ House of Venom for sending us this selection of photographs of him and his students in action.

Alex Jeyes pinning Crotalus adamanteus.
Check out our Mini Pinner Hook

Nick Fisher pinning Crotalus adamanteus.
Check out our Mini Pinner Hook

Nick Fisher tubing a Crotalus adamanteus.
Check out our Snake Restraining Tubes

Alex Jeyes tubing a PNG Taipan to remove a small piece of shed.
Check out our Snake Restraining Tubes

Alex Jeyes tubing a Crotalus Adamanteus for a health check.
Check out our Snake Restraining Tubes

Alex Jeyes tubing a Crotalus Horridus for a health check.
Check out our Snake Restraining Tubes

Ales Jeyes handling a Bitis rhinoceros with our O’Shea Hook.
Check out our Long O'Shea Hook

Date added: Nov 27, 2014 Go Pro Video from Borja Reh

Borja Reh from Zoo Aquarium Madrid has shot some amazing footage including Go Pro video of his crocodile monitor lizard ‘Nixon’.

 
Borja Reh
Grupo Atrox
Faunia
Naturaleza Misteriosa, Zoo Aquarium de Madrid
+34 650627014
borjareh@grupoatrox.com


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Venom Defender Gloves

Date added: Nov 26, 2014 Tubing a Puff Adder with a Go Pro

Here's a unique video by Ian Stephen in which he tubes a Puff Adder and uses a Go Pro to shoot inside-the-tube footage!


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Date added: Nov 24, 2014 Paul L. Lloyd shares his exciting experiences with us..

"Hi Clem, just thought I would share with you and your readers...

The snake in the photo with me handling it has recently been declared a new species of “Night Adder” (Causus rasmusseni). It was previously thought to be a colour variation of the Rhombic Night Adder (Causus rhombeatus). I’ve captured at least 30 of the in the past year. They seem to be exclusive to this corner of Zambia and the DRC.

Also, find here photos of one of the rarest snakes in the world, exclusive to the NW province of Zambia; Shreve’s Nocturnal Tree snake. Also known as a Shreve’s Marbled Tree Snake (Dipsadoboa shrevei). I’ve had the privilege of catch 2 of these since I’ve been here. They are a beautiful, graceful, docile snake - harmless."

Below is an article by Paul:

Shreve’s Nocturnal Tree Snake
(Dipsadoboa shrevei)    

This is not a snake that is likely to be encountered with any regularity by any of us. It is one of the rarest snakes in the world and is exclusive to the north-western corner of Zambia, spilling just over the border into the DRC. During 2013/2014, I have had the privilege of being able to exhibit 2 of these to various groups of students and community members.

According to Dr. Donald G. Broadley, in his book “Snakes of Zambia, an Atlas and a Field Guide” (2003), this snake averages 70cm – 90cm in length as an adult but have been encountered as long as 1.2m. The one in the photos (top/bottom left) was 1.26m and was captured at Kalumbila in the North Western Province. At the time, I had no idea what snake it was.

Described in the book as grey-brown in colour. However, I would describe the two specimens that I have had as black or gunmetal black.

This snake inhabits moist miombo woodland and gallery forest. It’s a nocturnal arboreal (tree-living) snake, living high in the forest canopy seldom venturing to ground level. They exist on a diet of chameleons, tree-living lizards, tree-living frogs and small birds.

After have experienced two of this species, my perception is that it’s a harmless, gentle and graceful snake, that is shy and elusive. Highly unlikely to be seen around human habitation. Does not attempt to bite when approached but will simply try to slip away quietly. The smaller one (above right), was captured after having fell out of a tree onto someone’s house in a densely forested area.

Nothing is known about its breeding habits.

Paul L. Lloyd
Training Systems Coordinator (Program development, Staff Development, Quality Control)

First Quantum Minerals & Operations
Solwezi
North Western Province
Zambia
Mobile: +260 96 584 5576
Bolder, Smarter, Driven

 

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Date added: Nov 21, 2014 A Perfect Christmas Gift...

Christmas is approaching, and this could be the perfect time to ask for an IDEAL present for any venomous snake keeper!

Instead of the usual socks, handkerchiefs or shawls, why not ask your mum, girlfriend or gran to buy you a pair of Venom Defender Gloves.

Used by professionals around the world, they will make your hobby safer, and give your loved ones that much wanted ‘peace of mind’.

Learn more about the Venom Defender Gloves

Date added: Nov 20, 2014 Handling a Western Green Mamba with Venom Defender Gloves

Here is a beautiful Western Green Mamba handled by Harold van der Ploeg:



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Date added: Nov 20, 2014 Handling an Aruba Rattlesnake with Venom Defender Gloves

This is an Aruba rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus unicolor Tonia) handled by Harold van der Ploeg.



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