News

Date added: May 3, 2016 Safely handling Grass Snakes with the M1 25” Converted Snake Tong

Josua Hannink from Holland has sent us these photographs of him handling a Ringslang (Grass Snakes, Natrix natrix) with a M1 25” Converted Snake Tong. The photos were taken during one of his field trips when he was out looking for snakes.

Handling Grass Snakes with Snake Tong 1

Handling Grass Snakes with Snake Tong 2

Handling Grass Snakes with Snake Tong 3

The soft EPDM padding conversion on this snake tong ensures that there is less chance of hurting the snake whilst enabling a good grip.

For more information about Joshua, visit:

www.future-morphs.com

www.youtube.com/FutureMorphs

www.facebook.com/FutureMorphs

Related products

M1 25” Converted Snake Tong

Date added: Mar 30, 2016 Meet Sterrin - Snake Woman Extraordinaire

We are proud to present to you a special lady who is well at ease with the bigger venomous snake variety. She is the other (better) half of the Dynamic Dutch Duo that is Sterrin & Romilly.

We would like to present you with a selection of photographs of Sterrin in action, taken over recent years. She has appearances in a newspaper article and on TV - testament to her fascinating character. Enjoy!

Sterrin 4

Sterrin 5

Sterrin 6

 

Learn more about her via her Facebook pages:  

Sterrin's Wild World

Sterrin Smalbrugge

Featured products  

Venom Defender Gloves

O’Shea Hook – Medium length with Standard Hook End

Mini Hook

Professional Field Hook

Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Mar 1, 2016 Handling a Mangrove Snake with Venom Defender Gloves

A regular contributor of superb features is Andy Laister. He recently send us these photos of himself handling a Mangrove snake.

Handling a Mangrove Snake

This is a Mangrove snake (Boiga dendrophila gemmicincta) from Central Sulawesi.  

In that part of Sulawesi they lose the yellow bands and become all black as they grow into adults.  

This species although venomous is back fanged and not considered to be dangerous to humans but they can still give a very hard bite which they will do given any opportunity.  

So its great to use the gloves rather than being covered in bites.

Regards,
Andy    

Mangrove Snake Handling Gloves

Text and Photos courtesy of Andy Laister.

Related product

Venom Defender Snake Handling Gloves

Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Feb 26, 2016 Handling a deadly venomous krait Bungarus flaviceps

krait Bungarus flaviceps

We are thrilled to have received these great photos from Tomáš Bublík of him handling a deadly venomous krait Bungarus flaviceps using our Venom Defender Gloves.

The photographs were taken at Leuser NP, north Sumatra in 2015.

Related products

Venom Defender Gloves

Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Feb 16, 2016 Handling a Javan spitting Cobra baby with Venom Defender Gloves

Handling a Javan spitting Cobra baby with Venom Defender Gloves

Andy Laister visited a great team of volunteers at the Bali Rescue Centre. There he demonstrated our Venom Defender Gloves as he was entrusted to handle a Javan spitting cobra baby.

Click here to find out more about the great work Bali Reptile rescue does:

http://breptile-rescue.blogspot.co.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/Breptilerescue/

Handling a Javan spitting Cobra baby with Venom Defender Gloves

"The snake is a Javan spitting cobra baby (Naja Sputatrix). This baby is the very light form sometimes found both on Java and Bali. Most babies are a dull brown colour. At this size they don't usually spit but I was taking no chances.

This one was collected by Bali Reptile rescue who do a great job on Bali. They will collect any snake from any property on Bali. I was with them for a week in November working on a King cobra project. They are looking into doing radio tracking of up to 10 adult King cobras.  

Regards, Andy"

Text and Photos courtesy of Andy Laister

Related products:  

Venom Defender Gloves

Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Feb 9, 2016 Paul Lloyd shares photos of his son handling Cobras

Paul Lloyd teaches his son how to handle cobras

We are delighted to have received photos from Paul L Lloyd showing the results of him teaching his son how to handle Cobras.

It’s great to see our Venom Defender Gloves helping to improve safety during such handling.

We are always excited whenever Paul sends us visuals of his handy-work. Fascinating and Awe Inspiring - always a pleasure!

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M1 40” Collapsible Snake Tongs – Converted with EPDM padding
Venom Defender Gloves

Date added: Feb 5, 2016 Siouxsie and Simon on NatGeoWild using Venom Defender Gloves and our Snake Handling Equipment

Snake city show featuring our Snake Gloves

Siouxsie and her partner Simon Keys who currently have a TV series are being aired in USA on NatGeoWild called ‘Snake City’

The new series will be aired in the UK on Monday 8th of February on Nat Geo Wild!

They are loyal supporters of Snake Professional and make good use of our Venom Defender Gloves as well as our M1 and Gentle Giant Tongs.

You will see them in a few precarious situations – so buckle up and don’t miss it!

P.s. Clips of the shows feature on the Nat Geo Wild website.

‘Hi Clem. Please note that in the clip titled 'ornery spitting cobra' it shows Simon putting on and using the gloves. The grass was to thick and long to enable a decent grab so the gloves were put on to make life easy!’


Siouxsie

Snake City

snake city 2

Image copyrights belong to Nat Geo Wild. For more information visit Nat Geo Wild

Related products:

Venom Defender Gloves
Gentle Giant Collapsible Snake Tongs
M1 40” Collapsible Snake Tongs – Converted with EPDM padding

Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Nov 9, 2015 Using gloves & snake tongs with venomous and non-venomous species

We are happy to have received some exciting feedback from Nikita Bedov in Spain.

Out in the field he is showing us how he uses our M1 Snake Tong to safely manipulate a blunt-nosed viper (Macrovipera lebetina).



Then in his snake-room he utilises our Venom Defender Gloves to handle an annulated tree boa (Corallus annulatus).

Here, Nikita shows us that our gloves can be used for handling a Common yellow scorpion (Buthus occitanus)

We are hopeful that these photographs will encourage snake enthusiasts that the correct tools make for a safer handling experience. Not only for venomous, but also for non venomous species!

Related products

M1 40” Collapsible Snake Tongs – Converted with EPDM padding
Venom Defender Gloves


Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Nov 6, 2015 Handling the elusive Vine Snake with Venom Defender Gloves

We are absolutely delighted to present to you an incredible article from Paul L Lloyd about the elusive Vine Snake (Thelotornis kirtlandi).

Also referred to as the Bird snake and Twig snake (Thelotornis capensis, Thelotornis capensis oatsii), Paul gives a delightful insight into this majestic creature. Paul visits schools in an effort to educate children, which hopefully results in the survival of this species long into the future.

Enjoy his article and the visuals of him handling it with our Venom Defender Gloves...

Bird snake, Vine snake, Twig snake                        
(Thelotornis capensis, Thelotornis kirtlandi, Thelotornis capensis oatsii)    

Known by all three of the common names in various parts of Southern and Central Africa, there are two distinct species. The Vine snake is generally encountered in woodland, thick bush or savannah. It’s a long slender snake in varying shades of brown, with darker bars across the body and with a unique, sharply elongated head which may be green or brown on the dorsal part and sometimes the whole head. The most common of the three species in the North Western Province of Zambia is Oat’s Vine Snake, as opposed to the Kirtland’s Vines snake (green head) which occurs more towards the east. Oat’s or the Savannah Vine snake, is green on the dorsal part of the head with a distinct brown “Y” shaped pattern. The “arms” of the “Y” point towards each of the eyes.



This snake is fairly unique in that it has excellent vision and eyes with horizontal pupils, shaped like key holes and is believed to be equipped with binocular vision for spotting prey from a distance.

Vine snakes often frequent bushes and low down branches of trees, which enable them to strike at ground living prey. Their diet consists of tree frogs, lizards, chameleons, small rodents and sometimes other snakes.

This snake can drape itself over branches and remain still for hours with up to a third of the front part of its body unsupported. Body colouring makes it perfectly camouflaged and very difficult to spot. Grows to a length of about 1.2m and may sometimes reach 1.5m.



Being an elusive snake it is almost never encountered near human habitation. Has the same venom and venom delivery system as the Boomslang (African Tree Snake) and is also a rear fanged snake. The venom is considered just as potent but extremely slow acting. Like the Boomslang, will inflate its neck and part of its body when agitated, revealing black skin between the scales.

When captured or intimidated vine snakes tend to be quite aggressive and will not hesitate to bite. Fortunately they are quite a slow striker and also has to work to embed the fangs situated at the rear of the mouth.



Vine snakes have quite an impressive looking tongue; bright orange with a black tip. As opposed to other snakes, where the tongue flickers rapidly, vine snakes appear more leisurely with the appearance of using the tongue to mimic a worm so as to lure birds. According to the experts this is not so; Vine snakes do not favour birds as prey.

Vine snakes lay from 5 to 12 eggs at the start of wet season (November).

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Venom Defender Gloves

For more detailed information contact Paul Lloyd (paul.lloyd@fqml.com)

Disclaimer; We at Snake Professional & 1-2-1 (Animal Handling) Products do NOT advise this method of handling and doing so is at the handlers own risk!

Date added: Oct 19, 2015 Bryan Grieg Fry catches Golden Lancehead Viper during field trip

Bryan Grieg Fry sent us this amazing shot of himself handling a Golden lancehead (Bothrops insularis). He is wearing Venom Defender Gloves for extra protection.

This extra safety can make that crucial difference, especially during field trips when medical help can often be far away.



Featured products

Venom Defender Gloves


Venom Doc – Bryan’s book



If anyone is interested in purchasing Bryan’s book; ‘Venom Doc’, then contact him on facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/bryangrieg.fry?fref=ts

Photo courtesy of Julien Barillon